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Spling's Galileo Pick of the Week: Love Actually


Spling's Pick of the Week - Love Actually at Meerendal

LOVE ACTUALLY @ MEERENDAL (23 Dec)

Love Actually is heartwarming, funny and tender... a film that embodies the Christmas spirit. Richard Curtis knows how to tug at heart strings and engross us in uplifting human comedy drama. Backed by an all-star cast, we're entertained by this family holiday romance, which has been copied but never bettered.

The feeling of familiarity you have with the characters, the airport sentiment and tales of love in all its intricacies is bound to soften even the hardest of hearts. British schmaltz has never been this enjoyable and with Bill Nighy keeping it real as a rock star, this one's worth dusting off for the holiday season.

This heartwarming Christmas comedy romance drama is showing under the stars at The Galileo Open Air Cinema.

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Spling's Galileo Pick of the Week: The Jungle Book


Spling's Pick of the Week - The Jungle Book at Kelvin Grove

THE JUNGLE BOOK @ KELVIN GROVE (18 Dec)

While the beloved 1967 Disney fairytale probably has a special place in most people's hearts, few would have guessed that it would be reimagined as a much darker "live–action" adaptation of Rudyard Kipling's books. Apart from being an extraordinary achievement in film-making, Iron Man director Jon Favreau has necessitated this "remake" by virtue of its more impactful adaptation. The original Disney classic gets tribute as various scenes echo in this version, however it's much more immediate and dangerous.

It holds the same enjoyment and entertainment factor, despite playing down the musical and comedy aspects, yet managing to get much more from its audience in terms of suspense and sheer wonder. It may not have the emotional resonance you'd expect from such a coming-of-age fable, but as a spectacle it's a marvel and will stay with you for days. Read more...

This brooding live-action Disney fantasy adventure is showing under the stars at The Galileo Open Air Cinema.

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Movie Review: Democrats


Democrats is a 2014 Danish documentary about the contentious 2008 election in Zimbabwe and the subsequent coalition's attempts to redraft the country's constitution. The film, directed by Camilla Nielsson, has been subsequently banned in Zimbabwe. In an interview with eNCA, Douglas Mwonzora, a lawyer and representative of the MDC-T said that the depiction of violence at various political meetings forced the censorship boards to ban this honest account of what happened behind-the-scenes. Filmed over three years, Nielsson gains seemingly unlimited access to COPAC campaigning and negotiations.

While this account is informative, eye-opening and even disturbing in the way misinformation and political tampering can impede constitutional progress, it's essentially the story of an unlikely friendship. ZANU-PF representative, Paul Mangwana, former Minister of Information and MDC–T representative, Douglas Mwonzora, are instructed to carry out the coalition government's mandate to draft a new constitution based on feedback from the people. So begins an arduous process of hosting thousands of rural and urban gatherings across the country to give the people an opportunity to speak.

Their task is to gather information and seed it into the drafting of a new constitution for Zimbabwe. However, the process is delayed through political interference, intimidation, violence and transporting additional party representatives into meeting areas. Intended to be peaceful, things break down and an inspirational governmental mission is hampered by false arrests, misinformation, instability and media involvement.

Democrats

"This revolution will be fought with pens and words..."

Through this journey, Mangwana and Mwonzora are at first pitted against each other, storming to get the best foothold for their political parties. Worthy adversaries, they maintain a healthy respect for one another, deliberating on a shared vision for a free and fair Zimbabwe. This common goal means different things for each of them, as one man tries to preserve the old order and the other tactfully negotiates his way to a more inclusive Zimbabwe. There's something to be said for the nation's sense of humour, for as serious as matters get, there's always room for a disarming laugh or smile.

Mangwana is a charming man and you could imagine Forest Whitaker taking on his role of devil's advocate, moving from self-assured smiles to the grave seriousness of a most wanted man. Mwonzora is a quietly confident man, who instead of resting on his party's legacy, is forced to use his lawyering skills in order to navigate a clear path. Their interactions range from affable to heated as they argue on various issues, from political meddling to contentious clauses.

Nielsson cleverly pivots the film on this relationship which demonstrates that while their political ideologies may differ, they are still able to get along. You wonder what kind of influence the documentation of their roles may have had on the outcome, since most people behave differently on camera. However, over such a long period of time, the filmmakers must have become like a fly-on-the-wall.

This is reinforced by footage capturing meeting violence and the honest expressions on the faces of these men. Being Danish, probably also aided them in representing a much more "independent" standpoint. Although, the translators are each listed as Anonymous in the credits, demonstrating just how unsettled the situation remains. While at face value, seemingly balanced, Mugabe and organised ZANU-PF machinations serve as a constant threat to completing the task of writing a new constitution.

Being a South African, the idea of drafting an inclusive and respected constitution echoes the sentiment of the New South Africa, which made this film more personal beyond sharing a border. The notion that two "enemies" can forge ahead and usher new life into a politically war-ravaged country is moving. Having journeyed with them through their many trials and transitions in Democrats, the thought that a suspended peace and justice can be achieved in a situation as volatile as Zimbabwe, is inspirational... even if for a brief moment in time.

The bottom line: Embroiled


 
Spling's Galileo Pick of the Week: Amelie


Spling's Pick of the Week - Amelie at Kirstenbosch

AMELIE @ KIRSTENBOSCH (7 Dec)

Amélie is a quaint, quirky and luminous French art house romance drama that is cherished by almost everyone that sees it. Delicately counterbalancing sentimental and whimsical, this film is the reason people take their garden gnomes and keepsakes on holiday. Audrey Tatou's magical and unforgettable performance has made her Amélie in everyone's hearts and minds. The trinket box tone and intimate cinematography keep us up close and personal with a charming, spirited and offbeat character, who never ceases to amuse and amaze us.

Many would say "it's so French" and they wouldn't be wrong! Encapsulating Paris from chimney tops to fresh produce stands makes it a quintessential French film. While cute, it navigates between roses and thorns to deliver a naive and uplifting romance story that will reignite the child-like innocence inside of everyone, making us want to believe in magic and perform random acts of kindness more readily.

This French art house classic is showing under the stars at The Galileo Open Air Cinema.

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