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The Ever-Shortening Gap Between Cinema and Streaming...


The whole lockdown and enforced break from cinemas got me thinking. We've been conditioned to think new releases are everything. In years gone by, theatrical releases would hold more power because you couldn't see it anywhere else, your friends would be talking about the film and after its cinema run, it would take months to become available on video. Nowadays the gap between cinema and video has shrunk to the point that some cinemas are actually showing films you can order as DVDs online or as pay-per-view. There are now more viewing platforms with their own original new releases that become available and stay accessible. There's just so much blooming entertainment content, it's difficult to see it all and chances are your friends probably won't even know what you're banging on about if you haven't committed to watching the same thing.

The whole condensation of entertainment media means that the urgency of a new theatrical release doesn't hold as much weight or appeal. There are exceptions with must-see blockbusters that capture our imagination, rock the box office and make kids believe they can fly or drift. These larger-than-life spectacles have kept commercial cinemas in the business of magic and the exclusivity and fan culture has nurtured these events. However, these escapist blockbusters from the realm of superheroes, space operas and car chases only come round 2 or 3 times a year.

After some thought, I think we can start appreciating old films as new. Most of them have been remastered to stand up against DVD and Blu-ray players. If you haven't seen it yet... you haven't been exposed to the director's vision or the time capsule of entertainment therein... it's essentially brand spanking new. We've been sold to believe in the idea of constantly consuming new products being thrown under our nose on a conveyor belt. Instead of trying to keep up with the wave of entertainment dropping every week or hitting 'Next Episode', perhaps now's the time to become more circumspect about the substance and quality of what we're actually watching.

We've witnessed this through content streaming platforms like Netflix where films that didn't get their dues originally are arriving as if new. Possibly slipping under the radar at the time of their release or fronting a star who's much bigger and important now, there's a curious thing happening as audiences discover hidden gems or castaway films. If someone in my position is struggling to keep up with the tide of mainstream films flowing into public view, there's got to be a glut of movies that will accumulating under these circumstances. It's great for Netflix to be capitalising on these dusty and forgotten movies, but perhaps it's pointing to a much bigger story around prizing open these little treasures.

In this spirit, I'm currently anticipating A Cure for Wellness, Cool Hand Luke, Bullitt, My Own Private Idaho, The Iron Giant, My Cousin Vinny and Listen to Me Marlon. It won't make sense to people used to having entertainment dished out to them... but in our wake is a century of films waiting to be seen. Now that disc prices have bottomed out and before these films stop being pressed, I'm making sure I get round to enjoying these "new" experiences.